The Studio Museum in Harlem: 50 Years

The Studio Museum in Harlem has championed artists of African descent for five decades. In 1968, a diverse group of artists, community activists, and philanthropists envisioned a new kind of art museum—one that would serve as a site for radical experimentation. They proposed an institution that would provide much-needed exhibition opportunities for black artists, support emerging artists with an innovative residency program, and engage audiences in Harlem and New York City with education and public programs for all ages.

Now, as we celebrate the Studio Museum’s 50th anniversary, we aim to honor this legacy by showcasing pivotal moments in our past and sharing our vision for the future. Join us as we reflect on the achievements of our artists, amplify the voices of our visitors, dive into our archives, and plan for our new home.

Studio Magazine 50th Anniversary Issue

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A Legacy of Leadership: Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims

Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims shares her personal perspectives and stories about her time at the helm of the Museum from 2000 to 2007.

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A Legacy of Leadership: Kinshasha Holman Conwill

Kinshasha Holman Conwill shares her personal perspectives and stories about her time at the helm of the Museum from 1980 to 1999.

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A Legacy of Leadership: Dr. Mary Schmidt Campbell

Dr. Mary Schmidt Campbell shares her personal perspectives and stories about her time at the helm of the Museum from 1977 to 1987.

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A Legacy of Leadership: Edward S. Spriggs

Edward S. Spriggs shares his personal perspectives and stories about his time at the helm of the Museum from 1969 to 1975.

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Letter from the Director: 50th Anniversary Issue

On the evening of September 24, 1968, The Studio Museum in Harlem opened its very first exhibition with a reception celebrating Tom Lloyd: Electronic Refractions II.

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